French Yorkie Scramble

French Yorkie Scramble. Vamp up scrambled egg by making it the French way and serving it in a giant British Yorkshire pudding for a decadent breakfast.
French Yorkie Scramble. Vamp up scrambled egg by making it the French way and serving it in a giant British Yorkshire pudding for a decadent breakfast.French Yorkie Scramble. Before I moved to France I was always amazed by the difference in the eggs as they are so yellow and creamy. Most people in the countryside have their own chickens and end up giving the eggs away and there is always a chicken  wandering in the road, which is not good for its health when my Weims get a sniff! I got the idea for this dish when I was thinking about my Christmas recipes. My boys have always loved scrambled egg and Yorkshire puddings but I've never served them together but I suppose it's a bit like having American pancakes at breakfast and makes a change from bread. In fact, if you have made the Yorkshire in advance this only takes a few minutes. There are probably thousands of versions of Yorkshire pudding but I use the measurements from a BBC Good Food recipe and just dump it all in a liquidiser, which makes it easy to pour too. For years I thought you had to let the mixture rest but it seems to make no difference.  French Yorkie Scramble. Vamp up scrambled egg by making it the French way and serving it in a giant British Yorkshire pudding for a decadent breakfast. Put plenty of oil in large Yorkshire tins and heat in the oven until almost smoking at 230 C. I don't take the tins out just pour the batter in  and shut the door. They take about 20 minutes. I tend to make them for a Sunday roast and then there is four left for tea. Put them in an airtight container and warm them in the oven before using. French Yorkie Scramble. Vamp up scrambled egg by making it the French way and serving it in a giant British Yorkshire pudding for a decadent breakfast. There's no need to beat the eggs first. Simply melt butter and crack the eggs directly into the pan and stir over a medium heat. When they are still soft add another dollop of butter or cream and turn off the heat. French Yorkie Scramble. Vamp up scrambled egg by making it the French way and serving it in a giant British Yorkshire pudding for a decadent breakfast. Pile the Yorkie scramble into the puddings and top with crisp bacon and a sprinkling of chives. If you are feeling naughty you could add a drizzle of maple syrup too.  So,who fancies this on Christmas morning then?
French Yorkie Scramble
Serves 4
French Yorkie Scramble. Vamp up scrambled egg by making it the French way and serving it in a giant British Yorkshire pudding for a decadent breakfast.
Write a review
Print
Cook Time
15 min
Cook Time
15 min
For the Yorkies
  1. 4 eggs
  2. 140g plain flour
  3. 200ml milk
  4. 1 tsp salt
  5. 1/2 tsp pepper
  6. oil
For the scramble
  1. 25g butter
  2. 8 eggs
  3. Extra 25g butter or 2 tbsp cream to stir in
For the Yorkies
  1. Put the eggs, seasoning, flour and milk in a liquidiser and mix until smooth.
  2. Heat oven to 230, line 2 X 4 pudding tins with oil and heat until smoking.
  3. Pour the batter into the tins whilst still in the oven and cook for 15-20 minutes until well risen and golden.
For the scramble
  1. Heat the butter in a large frying pan and crack in the eggs, stirring to mix.
  2. Cook over a medium heat, stirring constantly until the mixture is just set.
  3. Turn off the heat and stir in the butter or cream.
  4. Divide the mixture between 4 of the Yorkies and top with crisp bacon.
Notes
  1. Freeze the remaining Yorkies.
Adapted from BBC Good Food Yorkshire Pudding
Adapted from BBC Good Food Yorkshire Pudding
Chez Le Rêve Français http://chezlerevefrancais.com/

12 thoughts on “French Yorkie Scramble

    1. Is it the same as a popover? If you like pancakes you would enjoy these and if they come out flat (which they won’t) you just say they are pancakes!

  1. Have never heard of scrambled eggs inside Yorkshire puddings, in fact haven’t had Yorkshire puddings in years, but wow they look so delicious, I know the children would love them and me too and Roddy! So another one I have to make, a great lunch or light supper. Yum and we have chickens an plenty of eggs! Have a very Merry Christmas xx

    1. Thanks Susan. I’m hoping no one else had thought of it either! I guess old habits die hard for me but as you’ve travelled I expect you’ve come across much less stodge! I still stand outside the oven, watching to make sure they rise and I always cook them before everything else if I’m roasting. Is all of your brood home now? Just waiting for my elder son on Monday so have a lovely Christmas too xx

  2. Gosh…it’s after 2 in the afternoon and I haven’t eaten. I nearly licked the monitor when i saw this! I’m definitely going to try my hand at the Yorkshire Pudding now!

    1. You do have to try it Elizabeth. We also like it done as a Toadie as the pudding is crusty at the edges and more omelette in the middle. Let me know how you get on 😉

  3. This may and I repeat may get me to try and make for the first time Yorkshire pudding. I have never liked it but then you got me to like swedes as long as they are with carrots so this is on the might try list. Can’t believe they make pans for this nowadays.

    1. We have always had tins and mum’s mum was the pudding champion, although apart from pies, she couldn’t cook anything else! It’s definitely winter food though . Just think of it as a crunchy pancake!

  4. Such a clever idea and a neat way to eat eggs. 🙂 When you mentioned the chicken on the road, it reminded me of that joke about why the chicken crossed the road. You’ve obviously solved the mystery.
    My son and his wife gave me eggs their chickens had laid. They were delicious, nothing at all like the ‘free range’ eggs I get at the sujpermarket.

    1. Thank you, I thought it was a bit different for when we have guests staying. As for the chickens I dread my dogs coming back with one as these ones are all for walking down the road and not getting to the other side!

Leave a Reply