St Jean de Luz

A traveller's perspective on St Jean de Luz including food, history and language.
A traveller's perspective on St Jean de Luz including food, history and language.St Jean de Luz. On the south western tip of France and just  a few minutes from Spain, St Jean de Luz town is right on the seafront facing the Atlantic and the Bay of Biscay. With mountains surrounding the  pretty little town, studded with restaurants and little boutiques, surfing and plenty of coastal walkways it  could just be a perfect holiday spot .    A traveller's perspective on St Jean de Luz including food, history and language. The town is mostly pedestrianised which is great if you are like me and have to flit from one shop to another, dragging a reluctant husband, waiting to be handed shopping purchases. To me, some of the architecture was reminiscent of Venice but it just seemed much cleaner and much less busy. There is a central square, where many of the restaurants are situated. A traveller's perspective on St Jean de Luz including food, history and language.So, having been here almost two years, my French has definitely improved, although St Jean de Luz, as a holiday area many shopkeepers speak English. I knew that St Jean de Luz is situated in the  Basque country, but I expected the language to be a mixture of French and Spanish, not a strange melange of 'x' with 't' that is distinctly unpronounceable. Fairly regularly I get mistaken for being French, (I've no idea why with my pale skin),  so I wasn't surprised when a gaggle of school girls came up to me, except they were speaking in Basque. I answered in French but I still couldn't help them as they were looking for certain landmarks. C'est la vie! A traveller's perspective on St Jean de Luz including food, history and language. So moving on now to the main event; food, of course. Whilst the language is definitely beyond me, the food is certainly in my comfort zone.     A traveller's perspective on St Jean de Luz including food, history and language. Granted, liking seafood is probably an advantage. I think that apart from the hotel everything I ate was seafood, although there was never any crab or lobster on the menu. It was quite a view to see the fishing boats bringing in their catch with the mountains in the distance.   A traveller's perspective on St Jean de Luz including food, history and language.These wicked prawns were just a starter, simply fried in garlic, butter and chopped basil. It was a meal in itself. So there was a slight panic when the main course arrived, a marsicada, or a seafood platter. I was seduced by couteaux, or razor clams. They are my absolute favourite. This dish had more huge prawns, clams, langoustine, boulots,  (not even sure of translation but some sort of sea snail), mussels, chipirons (calamari or squid), and the obligatory bread! There was definitely no salad.... Another night and here was the starter. A traveller's perspective on St Jean de Luz including food, history and language. Although it was a slightly terrifying portion size everything was amazing. Then there was the tuna-fest main course. A traveller's perspective on St Jean de Luz including food, history and language. With all this healthy eating I just had to have a cafe gourmand. A traveller's perspective on St Jean de Luz including food, history and language. Lime mousse, chocolate and orange mousse and panna cotta with strawberry, all washed down with a shot of espresso.... And if you are interested, despite all the food we didn't put on any weight. It must be the French diet! Has anyone else been to St Jean de Luz?

2 thoughts on “St Jean de Luz

  1. don’t believe anybody when they tell you that basque is a mixture of french and spanish. I couldn’t understand one word of french, and my husband couldn’t understand one word of spanish. It was more challenging than being in Germany!!!

    1. I totally agree! I couldn’t work it out at all. Luckily most people spoke Franglais, which is my favourite!

Leave a Reply